New

The New Gallery currently contains a set of photographic studies that mimic digitally the photographic style of the pictorialists. 

Sudbury, MassachusettsHeard Farm, Wayland, MassachusettsHeard Farm, Wayand, MassachusettsMiddleton Plantation, Charleston, SCMiddleton Plantation, Charleston, SCHildene, Manchester, VermontSudbury, MassachusettsNine Acres, Concord, MassachusettsSudbury, MassachusettsWest Concord, MassachusettsSudbury, Massachusetts

As defined by the Wikipedia, “Pictorialism is the name given to an international style and aesthetic movement that dominated photography during the later 19th and early 20th centuries. There is no standard definition of the term, but in general it refers to a style in which the photographer has somehow manipulated what would otherwise be a straightforward photograph as a means of “creating” an image rather than simply recording it. Typically, a pictorial photograph appears to lack a sharp focus (some more so than others), is printed in one or more colors other than black-and-white (ranging from warm brown to deep blue) and may have visible brush strokes or other manipulation of the surface. For the pictorialist, a photograph, like a painting, drawing or engraving, was a way of projecting an emotional intent into the viewer’s realm of imagination.[1]

There is an excellent and succinct description of this style and the role played by atmosphere in an image from Alfred Stieglitz.Atmosphere is the medium through which we see all things. In order, therefore, to see them in their true value on a photograph, as we do in Nature, atmosphere must be there. Atmosphere softens all lines; it graduates the transition from light to shade; it is essential to the reproduction of the sense of distance. That dimness of outline which is characteristic for distant objects is due to atmosphere. Now, what atmosphere is to Nature, tone is to a picture.” Illustratively we have the masterpiece of Figure 1 Montmartre, 1906 by Emile Joachim Constant Puyo.

My goal here is to create photographs that look like or create the feeling of impressionist paintings. I have stretched things a bit by not confining myself to black and white. Indeed, almost all of the images are in color.

Figure 1 - Emile Joachim Constant Puyo, Montmartre, ca. 1906. This is one of the images featured in the MFA exhibit on Pictorialism. This image is from the Wikimediacommons and from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC. In the public domain in the United States because it is more than 75 yrs. old.

Figure 1 – Emile Joachim Constant Puyo, Montmartre, ca. 1906. This is one of the images featured in the MFA exhibit on Pictorialism. This image is from the Wikimediacommons and from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC. In the public domain in the United States because it is more than 75 yrs. old.